theduplicitytimes:

6 WRITING TIPS FROM JOHN STEINBECK
Abandon the idea that you are ever going to finish. Lose track of the 400 pages and write just one page for each day, it helps. Then when it gets finished, you are always surprised.
Write freely and as rapidly as possible and throw the whole thing on paper. Never correct or rewrite until the whole thing is down. Rewrite in process is usually found to be an excuse for not going on. It also interferes with flow and rhythm which can only come from a kind of unconscious association with the material.
Forget your generalized audience. In the first place, the nameless, faceless audience will scare you to death and in the second place, unlike the theater, it doesn’t exist. In writing, your audience is one single reader. I have found that sometimes it helps to pick out one person—a real person you know, or an imagined person and write to that one.
If a scene or a section gets the better of you and you still think you want it—bypass it and go on. When you have finished the whole you can come back to it and then you may find that the reason it gave trouble is because it didn’t belong there.
Beware of a scene that becomes too dear to you, dearer than the rest. It will usually be found that it is out of drawing.
If you are using dialogue—say it aloud as you write it. Only then will it have the sound of speech.
"If there is a magic in story writing, and I am convinced there is, no one has ever been able to reduce it to a recipe that can be passed from one person to another. The formula seems to lie solely in the aching urge of the writer to convey something he feels important to the reader. If the writer has that urge, he may sometimes, but by no means always, find the way to do it. You must perceive the excellence that makes a good story good or the errors that makes a bad story. For a bad story is only an ineffective story."

theduplicitytimes:

6 WRITING TIPS FROM JOHN STEINBECK

  1. Abandon the idea that you are ever going to finish. Lose track of the 400 pages and write just one page for each day, it helps. Then when it gets finished, you are always surprised.
  2. Write freely and as rapidly as possible and throw the whole thing on paper. Never correct or rewrite until the whole thing is down. Rewrite in process is usually found to be an excuse for not going on. It also interferes with flow and rhythm which can only come from a kind of unconscious association with the material.
  3. Forget your generalized audience. In the first place, the nameless, faceless audience will scare you to death and in the second place, unlike the theater, it doesn’t exist. In writing, your audience is one single reader. I have found that sometimes it helps to pick out one person—a real person you know, or an imagined person and write to that one.
  4. If a scene or a section gets the better of you and you still think you want it—bypass it and go on. When you have finished the whole you can come back to it and then you may find that the reason it gave trouble is because it didn’t belong there.
  5. Beware of a scene that becomes too dear to you, dearer than the rest. It will usually be found that it is out of drawing.
  6. If you are using dialogue—say it aloud as you write it. Only then will it have the sound of speech.

"If there is a magic in story writing, and I am convinced there is, no one has ever been able to reduce it to a recipe that can be passed from one person to another. The formula seems to lie solely in the aching urge of the writer to convey something he feels important to the reader. If the writer has that urge, he may sometimes, but by no means always, find the way to do it. You must perceive the excellence that makes a good story good or the errors that makes a bad story. For a bad story is only an ineffective story."

(Reblogged from randomblunder)

cabinporn:

Towering treehouse in the hills north of Santa Cruz, CA.

Submitted & photographed by John Watson.

More at The Radavist.

(Reblogged from treeporn)
So when people I like do something terrible,” I said, “I just flense them and forgive them.”
”Flense?” he said. “What’s flense?”
“It’s what whalers used to do to whale carcasses when they got them on board,” I said. “They would strip off the skin and blubber and meat right down to the skeleton. I do that in my head to people—get rid of all the meat so I can see nothing but their souls. Then I forgive them.
Bluebeard, Kurt Vonnegut (via jemexcusemaman)
(Reblogged from jemexcusemaman)

(Source: carolinagetaway)

(Reblogged from herbertsona)

Crazy On You - Heart

Ann was such a babe

mermaaidy:

cannon beach, oregon from ecola state park

(Reblogged from westcoastgirlscout)
imjuststardust:

Likes | Tumblr on We Heart It.

imjuststardust:

Likes | Tumblr on We Heart It.

(Reblogged from imjuststardust)
Freedom is what we do with what is done to us.
Jean-Paul Sartre (via zenhumanism)
(Reblogged from zenhumanism)
redguitarrr:

“Its expressive power is amazing, and at the same time it is void of all sentimentality and superfluous ornaments. It is simple, sometimes primitive but never silly. It is the ideal starting point for a musical renaissance, and a composer in search of new ways cannot be led by a better master.” — Bela Bartók on folk music in an essay from 1931 [via]

redguitarrr:

Its expressive power is amazing, and at the same time it is void of all sentimentality and superfluous ornaments. It is simple, sometimes primitive but never silly. It is the ideal starting point for a musical renaissance, and a composer in search of new ways cannot be led by a better master.
Bela Bartók on folk music in an essay from 1931 [via]

(Reblogged from redguitarrr)
Played 917 times

liv-ullmanns:

Donovan - Wear Your Love Like Heaven

(Reblogged from liv-ullmanns)

I think I’ve begun to thrive on that uncanny feeling you get when someone you just meet feels unmistakably familiar. The older I get, the more often it happens; and I sense that I’m not the only one this phenomenon affects. And I wonder if the people I feel it toward, are feeling it too. Such things are rarely spoken of in the moment. But sometimes I point it out, and there has been mutual familiarity and it’s really pleasant. So much so that I feel a warmth or at “home” in this fishbowl for a brief passing of time.

The real tragedy of life may just be that we’re all here enduring the seediness, when if exposed in entirety, we may actually come to know that everything is indeed one and the same. Here now we delight in the trials of individuality. Will I ever be anything other than what someone else intended, somewhere else in some other time? True freedom is sensing that ancient extension of yourself in strangers, and by no means of ego or fear. Only love is left, right?

(Reblogged from earthlyexistence)
(Reblogged from m3zzaluna)
Played 635 times

mnemonic-amnesia:

Louis Prima : Buona Sera

For all those northern Italian girls that melt my heart

(Reblogged from mnemonic-amnesia)

With all good things, the mind goes home again